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London to Australia in 4 hours anyone?

Started by DD1975, January 02, 2012, 09:15:05 AM

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DD1975

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16090841

Could it be a reaality, probably not due to commercial factors but still an interesting read all the same  :D
Smoke me a Kipper I'll be back for breakfast - Ace Rimmer

Snowcrash

This sort of thing comes round every few years. Never gonna happen in this financial market.

Look how much concord overran budget. This would be the same. Virtually impossible to judge costs due to unknowns. Nice dream though.

This is closer to reality though...
http://www.virgingalactic.com/
"I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me."

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Data

I guess time will tell, but worth keeping an eye on all the same.

Good to see Virgingalctic is a combined, and so far successful venture between the UK and the good old US of A.

Here is one of the most recent vids of the Virgingalctic spacecraft.



Snowcrash

Weird. Never seen a craft do that before.

I assume this stops some of the friction involved on re-entry.
"I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me."

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Diesel

Cool that. I'm not sure quite how that works, I assume it over comes the sheer velocity on re entry ?.  :scratch-head:
It WILL be fine !...

DD1975

Found this discription of Spaceshipone on the encyclopedia astronautica:

The unique configuration allowed aircraft-like qualities for boost, glide, and landing. Rutan wanted to avoid the use of fly-by-wire stability augmentation systems normally required to handle the instability inherent in transonic aircraft. He originally planned to use petal-like drag brakes, to be followed by a vertical parachute recovery. But finally he decided to use pneumatic actuators to pop-up the wing and tail boom in a 'shuttlecock' configuration. This provided for a stable high-drag re-entry, which required no control inputs from the pilot. After the aircraft had slowed to 160 kph, the wings and tail would return to their normal position, and the pilot would fly the aircraft in a 185 kph glide in descending circles to the airfield.

Pretty darned clever really  8)
Smoke me a Kipper I'll be back for breakfast - Ace Rimmer